The Air Tool Compak fully assembled and ready for use.
The Air Tool Compak fully assembled and ready for use.

Air Tool Compak » Specialized's Air Tool Compak is designed to be a small floor pump that is easy to travel with and take on adventures.

In this review, we look at 3 accessories from Specialized. The Fuel Cell is a Shiv specific storage unit, the Reserve Rack is a rear hydration and tool mount, and the Air Tool Compak is a portable pump.


Back to article: Review: Specialized Fuel Cell, Reserve Rack, Air Tool


Tags » hydration,  nutrition,  shiv,  specialized,  tools

Fuel Cell 

The Specialized Fuel Cell is a Shiv specific storage system designed to mate perfectly to the frame and not add any frontal area to the bike. Specialized goes so far as to say that its design reduces drag.

  • Specialized's Fuel Cell attached to my Shiv.
  • Specialized's Fuel Cell attached to my Shiv.
  • Specialized's Fuel Cell attached to my Shiv.
  • Gels can be stored in the rubber top cap of the Fuel Cell.  They can be easily accessed while riding via a slit in the top of the rubber cap.
  • Gels can be stored in the rubber top cap of the Fuel Cell.  They can be easily accessed while riding via a slit in the top of the rubber cap.
  • Gels can be stored in the rubber top cap of the Fuel Cell.  They can be easily accessed while riding via a slit in the top of the rubber cap.
  • The rubber top cap is held in place via a friction fit.  It pulls off to allow access to the spare parts in the compartment below.
  • There is a tab on the top of the main compartment that is used to release the Fuel Cell.  The main compartment can then be removed to make loading easier.
  • There is a tab on the top of the main compartment that is used to release the Fuel Cell.  The main compartment can then be removed to make loading easier.
  • There is a tab on the top of the main compartment that is used to release the Fuel Cell.  The main compartment can then be removed to make loading easier.
  • The Fuel Cell's mount attaches to the bottle bosses on the seat tube.
  • The rubber top cap is held in place via a friction fit.  It pulls off to allow access to the spare parts in the compartment below.
  • The Fuel Cell and my old saddle bag.  The saddle bag looks much smaller, but it holds a lot more due to its increased width.
  • The Fuel Cell and my old saddle bag.  The saddle bag looks much smaller, but it holds a lot more due to its increased width.
  • The Fuel Cell and my old saddle bag.  The saddle bag looks much smaller, but it holds a lot more due to its increased width.
  • These are the items I normally carry in my flat kit: 2 tire levers, 2 CO2 Cartridges, a spare tube, a compact inflater head, a spare master link, and a small multi-tool.  The tube has not been unpacked or tested.  After filling it up and testing it, you wouldn't be able to get enough air out to make it this compact ever again.  But even with the tube in this state, these items will not fit in the Fuel Cell.
  • After losing the rubber top cap, I used electrical tape to cover the top of my Fuel Cell.  Specialized was friendly and replaced the top cap free of charge, but I am pretty sure that it will get lost again.  The top cap is held in place via a friction fit.  If the items in the Fuel Cell shift around on a bumpy road, they could push up on the cap and cause it to come off.

Reserve Rack 

The Specialized Reserve Rack is a mounting system that allows one to carry a single saddle bottle as well as some inflation accessories. The product comes with three pieces: a mount that attaches to your saddle rails, a wing that will carry inflation accessories, and an optional Rib Cage.

  • Specialized's Reserve Rack can hold 2 CO2 cartridges on one side and a pump on the other side.  The CO2 cartridges thread onto a coupler that comes with the Reserve Rack.  Elastic bands hold the CO2 coupler and pump to the Reserve Rack.
  • Specialized's Reserve Rack can hold 2 CO2 cartridges on one side and a pump on the other side.  The CO2 cartridges thread onto a coupler that comes with the Reserve Rack.  Elastic bands hold the CO2 coupler and pump to the Reserve Rack.
  • Specialized's Reserve Rack can hold 2 CO2 cartridges on one side and a pump on the other side.  The CO2 cartridges thread onto a coupler that comes with the Reserve Rack.  Elastic bands hold the CO2 coupler and pump to the Reserve Rack.
  • The mount that comes with the Reserve Rack clamps onto your saddle's rails.  There is no angle adjustment on the clamp.  In order to use the clamp, your saddle needs to have standard rails, and enough room to get the clamp in.
  • The mount that comes with the Reserve Rack clamps onto your saddle's rails.  There is no angle adjustment on the clamp.  In order to use the clamp, your saddle needs to have standard rails, and enough room to get the clamp in.
  • The mount that comes with the Reserve Rack clamps onto your saddle's rails.  There is no angle adjustment on the clamp.  In order to use the clamp, your saddle needs to have standard rails, and enough room to get the clamp in.
  • This is the wing that holds inflation accessories.  The wing gets sandwiched between the mount, and the bottle cage.  The bolts for the bottle cage go through the holes on the wing.  In this photo, 2 CO2 cartridges have been threaded onto a coupler that comes with the Reserve Rack.  If you prefer to carry Pit Stop instead of CO2, you may store it where the CO2 coupler is attached in this photo.  This means that your choices are 2 CO2 cartridges + pump, or Pit Stop + pump.  Neither of these combinations suits my personal needs, but you may find that these combos suit you.
  • In this photo, the wing and cage are attached directly to the Sitero's bottle mount.  This way you don't need the mount that comes with the Reserve Rack, and results in a slightly cleaner setup.  I am using the Rib Cage that comes with the Reserve Rack, but you could in theory use the wing with any bottle cage.
  • In this photo, the wing and cage are attached directly to the Sitero's bottle mount.  This way you don't need the mount that comes with the Reserve Rack, and results in a slightly cleaner setup.  I am using the Rib Cage that comes with the Reserve Rack, but you could in theory use the wing with any bottle cage.
  • In this photo, the wing and cage are attached directly to the Sitero's bottle mount.  This way you don't need the mount that comes with the Reserve Rack, and results in a slightly cleaner setup.  I am using the Rib Cage that comes with the Reserve Rack, but you could in theory use the wing with any bottle cage.
  • In this photo, the wing and cage are attached directly to the Sitero's bottle mount.  This way you don't need the mount that comes with the Reserve Rack, and results in a slightly cleaner setup.  I am using the Rib Cage that comes with the Reserve Rack, but you could in theory use the wing with any bottle cage.
  • In this photo, the wing and cage are attached directly to the Sitero's bottle mount.  This way you don't need the mount that comes with the Reserve Rack, and results in a slightly cleaner setup.  I am using the Rib Cage that comes with the Reserve Rack, but you could in theory use the wing with any bottle cage.  I have added a camelbak Podium Chill bottle.
  • View from the back with a bottle attached.
  • In this photo, the wing and cage are attached directly to the Sitero's bottle mount.  This way you don't need the mount that comes with the Reserve Rack, and results in a slightly cleaner setup.  I am using the Rib Cage that comes with the Reserve Rack, but you could in theory use the wing with any bottle cage.  I have added a camelbak Podium Chill bottle.
  • In this photo, the wing and cage are attached directly to the Sitero's bottle mount.  This way you don't need the mount that comes with the Reserve Rack, and results in a slightly cleaner setup.  I am using the Rib Cage that comes with the Reserve Rack, but you could in theory use the wing with any bottle cage.  I have added a camelbak Podium Chill bottle.
  • While testing to see if the Rib Cage that comes with the Fuel Cell was more prone to bottle launching than my other cages, I tried the cage on a different rear mount to compare how the cage preformed on different setups.  While using an XLAB Carbon Wing setup as shown, the Rib Cage launched just as frequently as when I used it on the Reserve Rack.  I found that the Rib Cage launched less than my cheapo no-name cages, but more than my XLAB Gorilla XT.  The Rib Cage held bottles decently when full, but tended to launch more as I emptied the bottles.

Air Tool Compak 

Specialized's Air Tool Compak is designed to be a small floor pump that is easy to travel with and take on adventures.

  • The Air Tool Compak fully assembled and ready for use.
  • The padded case that comes with Specialized's Air Tool Compak.
  • Everything fits nicely in the case, and there is definitely some extra room should you wish to store some other small items.
  • The handles locks onto the side of the pump.  The hose wraps around the top of the pump, and is held in place via a clip on the side of the pump.  There is a grove in the top of the pump for the hose.  This keeps the hose in place, and prevents the pump from sliding out while traveling.
  • This is the button in the center of the handle that you push to unlock the handle.
  • This is the button in the center of the handle that you push to unlock the handle.
  • The handle has a locking square fitting on the bottom which keeps the handle in place.
  • The top of the pump has a grove for the hose.  This keeps the hose in place, and prevents the pump from sliding out while traveling.
  • The head is reversible.  It can be unscrewed to switch from Presta to Schrader.
  • This is the Air Tool Compak's pressure gauge.  I didn't even notice it at first.  After you start pumping, a stick slides out indicating the current pressure.
  • This is the Air Tool Compak's pressure gauge.  I didn't even notice it at first.  After you start pumping, a stick slides out indicating the current pressure.
  • This is the Air Tool Compak's pressure gauge.  I didn't even notice it at first.  After you start pumping, a stick slides out indicating the current pressure.  It indicates both BAR and PSI
  • This is the Air Tool Compak's pressure gauge.  I didn't even notice it at first.  After you start pumping, a stick slides out indicating the current pressure.  It indicates both BAR and PSI
  • Here you can see the amount the handle will extend while pumping.  I found using the pump to be easier than I though it would be, and totally acceptable for a pump of this size.
  • These are the patch tools that come with the Air Tool Compak.  On the left you have several stick on patches.  On the right are two tire levers.  These all can be stored in the handle during transport.  I was disappointed by the fact that they included a patch kit instead of some tools.
  • Here you can compare the size of the Air Tool Compak to a standard floor pump.  The pump in this picture is a Topeak Joe Blow Sport II (on top).  It is a bit longer than the Air Tool Compak.  You can't tell from this photo, but it is also quite a bit wider.

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