FIRST LOOK: Pinarello Bolide
images by Nick Salazar
Sep 21, 2013  hits 125,537

The Bolide has all the right lines: dropped downtube, form-hugging seat tube, integrated brakes that actually hide the cables, and a very slick integrated aerobar.
The Bolide has all the right lines: dropped downtube, form-hugging seat tube, integrated brakes that actually hide the cables, and a very slick integrated aerobar.

Since its debut just prior to the Tour de France, I've been keen to get a first-hand look at Pinarello's new mean machine. The Bolide is a seriously-awesome time trial bike, built with obvious attention to detail. It has beautifully-integrated brakes, bars, and completely internal cables. Here is a gallery of detailed images of this bike, found at Pinarello's booth on the Interbike showroom floor.



  • The Bolide has all the right lines: dropped downtube, form-hugging seat tube, integrated brakes that actually hide the cables, and a very slick integrated aerobar.
  • Other pictures I've seen of this rear brake have suggested there's almost no wheel clearance. Getting low, you can see that there's actually plenty of clearance. Pinarelly did their homework on this one. It's also really nice that the rear wheel stays in its usual location, where it's easier to access and adjust.
  • Now THIS angle was tough to capture, but allows you to see that the brake's return spring is a small compression spring, just like the one found on the Speed Concept. This doesn't work quite as well as a large U-spring as found on the Felt IA, Bayonet 4 fork, and TriRig Omega, but it works nonetheless.
  • Rear angle on the bike.
  • Lower section of the Pinarello Bolide.
  • Adjustable horizontal dropouts, clean Di2 cable routing.
  • Notice how the cables can't be seen from ANY angle? That's because they're ALL properly hidden.
  • That aerobar is as clean as they come. Perhaps it has a little more drop than is ideal (I'd prefer if the base bar was flat), but I'll bet Sir Bradley's personal preferences had something to do with this.
  • Boom!
  • Interestingly, there's a bit of a bulge behind the head tube. Not sure why that is.
  • Front brake. It's almost exactly like the one in the Trek Speed Concept.
  • Aerobar extension clamping and adjustment hardware. The bar also has several spots for stance width adjustment. In my opinion it's not 100% ideal, because the pads stack up directly over the extensions, when I'd like them to be a little further out from them. But doing it this way saves some frontal area, and you can always space the whole setup out and roll the extensions back in to achieve a more normal geometry.
  • Lots of spots for pad adjustment - nice.
  • Truncated airfoils have exploded on the bike scene in the last few years. They have a lot of advantages on tri bikes, including the fact that they can help smooth out airflow over a water bottle.
  • The Bolide has bottle bosses way up high by the head tube - I wonder what accessories might be developed for this spot.
  • Now THIS is sweet - custom Di2 shifters integrated into the Bolide's aerobar. Pinarello has been doing this for a while on the Graal. I wish these were publicly available, they look awesome.
  • Two-bolt saddle clamp. Not my favorite version, but it works fine.
  • Two bolt rear-address seatpost clamp. This seems to be the industry's favorite way to go, and probably the most reliable.
  • So smooth! I really like what Pinarello has done with this bike. It's simply awesome. In many ways, it's a LOT like Trek's Speed Concept, at least in terms of features and aesthetics. I'd like to get one to review, so I can find out how it builds up. As far as the Trek bike goes, I'll be doing an in-depth review of the new SC in the near future. So keep your eyes peeled for that.

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