TriRig's Pedal Shootout
images by Nick Salazar
Jul 29, 2012  hits 154,864

Instead of using the ski binding style to retain the pedals, Keywin uses a novel locking system that is effective, durable, simple, and very light.
Instead of using the ski binding style to retain the pedals, Keywin uses a novel locking system that is effective, durable, simple, and very light.

With so many pedals on the market, it can be absolutely dizzying for an athlete to try and make sense of the offerings. In this shootout, we are going to pick apart some of the major mechanisms represented by a variety of pedals, and take a deep look into what they do, and how they stack up against one another. We're also giving a very brief hint at an upcoming TriRig product that is in the works.


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Tags » aerolite,  keywin,  pedals,  shimano,  speedplay
  • Dura Ace pedals are the gold standard: rock solid function, bombproof dependability, and beautiful looks. Unfortunately, they're a bit pricey, and not very light compared to other offerings.
  • Dura ace pedal tension is set by a single hex bolt.
  • The ski-binding clamshell is a design that has been around for decades, and works well.
  • No more exposed spring; Dura-Ace keeps things tidy and protected from road grime.
  • A replaceable wear plate extends the life of these already very durable pedals.
  • I ride fixed, so for Shimano's pedals that means using the red cleats. Float is achieved by using the yellow cleats, which have a smaller 'nose' up front.
  • Dura Ace Carbon pedals have a rather large platform, although in our opinion platform size is a bit of a red herring, especially as carbon soles become so much stiffer.
  • The distinctive profile of the Dura-Ace pedals is impossible to miss. Their stack height looks super low, but is actually in the middle of the road.
  • The new Keywin Carbon pedals. I'm a big fan of Keywin's bold willingness to stick to their guns and use a unique pedal mechanism. It works well, and keeps the weight low.
  • Most of the Keywin pedal consists of injection-molded plastic parts, and the new version also has carbon in the mix for lighter weight and a stiffer body.
  • Instead of using the ski binding style to retain the pedals, Keywin uses a novel locking system that is effective, durable, simple, and very light.
  • Keywin's pedal allows for float tension to be controlled or removed via adjustments at the pedal itself. Here, I'm removing the 6-degree float insert, which will be replaced by my preferred fixed insert.
  • With the insert out, you can see the interior of the pedal. Installing the fixed-pedal insert was a snap - literally.
  • The thin cleats look easy to walk on, but might be a little slick on smooth surfaces, until they get roughed up with use and develop a little more grip.
  • Maintenance of the Keywin Carbon pedals is easy, most of it is accessible through the screws and nuts on the underside of the pedal body.
  • There are tons of pedals on the market, but most of them share one of a few different mechanical concepts.
  • TriRig decided to take a look at four distinct pedals, each with a different mechanism, and uncover how their strengths and weaknesses play out for triathletes.
  • Aerolite is the undisputed king of simplicity and light weight, but unfortunately is very inconvenient to use.
  • With only three parts, and about 40 grams per pedal, there's nothing that even comes close to beating the Aerolite, for those who can tolerate its eccentricities and inconvenient mounting.
  • Aerolite's primary disadvantage is that you have to drill your shoes in order to use them. TriRig will soon be manufacturing a pedal that uses this type of retention mechanism, but eliminates the drawbacks.

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