Dimond unveils new Super Fork
images by Nick Salazar
Oct 6, 2015  hits 72,301

The Dimond Superbike, in all its new superfork-enhanced glory.
The Dimond Superbike, in all its new superfork-enhanced glory. Photo Gallery » 

Although it has been available to the public for over a year, the Dimond Superbike was always incomplete without its own fork. The company has been selling the bike with the 3T Funda since launch. Today, a new option has been unveiled, a 'Super Fork' for want of a better term, that integrates cleanly with the shape of the bike, hides the front brake cable, and was designed specifically to work with our own Omega X brake. A magnetic cover shields the brake and cable from the wind, and ensuring easy access to brake internals. The fork legs are exceptionally wide, far wider than anything else on the market. According to Dimond, this was originally intended to improve zero-yaw drag, but in fact ended up having a more noticeable effect on higher yaw. The fork will be available as a $1200 a-la-carte option for existing Dimond customers, and also available with new framesets. At $1200, it's a very expensive part for what is essentially a standard-construction fork (no external steerer, no integrated structural parts) plus magnetic cover. But Dimond owners will likely be thrilled at the chance for a faster and cleaner front end, heretofore a bit of an achilles heel for the bike. The cheaper 3T Funda build will also be available. Check out the gallery for lots of shots and info on this new part.



Tags » dimond,  forks,  frames,  hawaii2015,  rigs

Photo Gallery 

  • The Dimond Superbike, in all its new superfork-enhanced glory.
  • Here it is: the new Dimond Bike, complete with the new Super Fork. Dimond is still working on a more official-sounding name, but has used 'Super Fork' in house for some time.
  • Here it is: the new Dimond Bike, complete with the new Super Fork. Dimond is still working on a more official-sounding name, but has used 'Super Fork' in house for some time.
  • Here it is: the new Dimond Bike, complete with the new Super Fork. Dimond is still working on a more official-sounding name, but has used 'Super Fork' in house for some time.
  • The new fork is incredibly deep section, and also uses ultra-wide stance fork blades.
  • The new fork is incredibly deep section, and also uses ultra-wide stance fork blades.
  • A magnetic snap-on cover hides the cables while providing easy access to the brake internals.
  • The fork blades easily swallow the entirety of the Omega brake. No word on whether the fork works with other brakes, but it certainly works well with the Omega.
  • The fork blades easily swallow the entirety of the Omega brake. No word on whether the fork works with other brakes, but it certainly works well with the Omega.
  • The fork blades easily swallow the entirety of the Omega brake. No word on whether the fork works with other brakes, but it certainly works well with the Omega.
  • A new rear-address seatpost clamp is designed to work better than the predecessor.
  • A new pearlescent chameleon paint reflects light differently depending on the angle, playing up the jewelry theme of the company name. It looks lovely in person.
  • A new pearlescent chameleon paint reflects light differently depending on the angle, playing up the jewelry theme of the company name. It looks lovely in person.
  • Another look at that pearlescent 'chameleon' paint.
  • A magnetic snap-on cover hides the cables while providing easy access to the brake internals.
  • The stem/beam junction has been subject of much depate, as it leaves a significant gap with most stems. Dimond showed their new fork on a bike with the 3T Aduro, which helps to minimize that gap. They are also working on some 3D-printed gap-fillers that have made their way into the public eye.
  • Some shots of the brake without its magnetic cover attached.
  • Some shots of the brake without its magnetic cover attached.
  • Some shots of the brake without its magnetic cover attached.
  • Some shots of the brake without its magnetic cover attached.
  • And with the cover back on.
  • A look at the fork's dropouts.
  • Omega X in rear as well.
  • One last parting shot from the rear quarter of the fork.

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