FIRST LOOK: Bianchi Aquila
images by Andrew Strauss
Sep 11, 2014  hits 38,487

The Bianchi Aquila CV.
The Bianchi Aquila CV.

Bianchi had a new TT bike on display called the Aquila CV, which they expect to be available in early 2015. This will be a UCI legal bike, initially targeted at the TT crowd. A TRI version of the bike will be available later on, but the frame will be mostly unchanged. The TRI version will get some hydration and storage modifications to the front end. The bike looks very clean, and we hope to write a detailed review of the bike sometime next year. There are more details about the bike in the photo captions.



  • The Bianchi Aquila CV.
  • The cockpit of the Bianchi Aquila CV.  The bike uses a one piece stem and base bar combo that sits flush with the top tube.  There will be several lengths available for the stem, but no height adjustment as they feel it must be flush with the top tube in order to preserve the aerodynamics of the bike.  Stack height is adjusted at the pads.  The S-Bend extensions don't stick out the back of the clamps, so you must cut them to your desired length.  The bike will work with either a mechanical or electronic drive train, but was shown with Shimano Di2.  When using an electronic drive train, all the wires are routed internally.  The Di2 A junction is hidden behind the front brake cover.  For a mechanical setup, the derailuer cables would exit out the back of the extensions.
  • The cockpit of the Bianchi Aquila CV.  The bike uses a one piece stem and base bar combo that sits flush with the top tube.  There will be several lengths available for the stem, but no height adjustment as they feel it must be flush with the top tube in order to preserve the aerodynamics of the bike.  Stack height is adjusted at the pads.  The S-Bend extensions don't stick out the back of the clamps, so you must cut them to your desired length.  The bike will work with either a mechanical or electronic drive train, but was shown with Shimano Di2.  When using an electronic drive train, all the wires are routed internally.  The Di2 A junction is hidden behind the front brake cover.  For a mechanical setup, the derailuer cables would exit out the back of the extensions.
  • The cockpit of the Bianchi Aquila CV.  The bike uses a one piece stem and base bar combo that sits flush with the top tube.  There will be several lengths available for the stem, but no height adjustment as they feel it must be flush with the top tube in order to preserve the aerodynamics of the bike.  Stack height is adjusted at the pads.  The S-Bend extensions don't stick out the back of the clamps, so you must cut them to your desired length.  The bike will work with either a mechanical or electronic drive train, but was shown with Shimano Di2.  When using an electronic drive train, all the wires are routed internally.  The Di2 A junction is hidden behind the front brake cover.  For a mechanical setup, the derailuer cables would exit out the back of the extensions.
  • The cockpit of the Bianchi Aquila CV.  The bike uses a one piece stem and base bar combo that sits flush with the top tube.  There will be several lengths available for the stem, but no height adjustment as they feel it must be flush with the top tube in order to preserve the aerodynamics of the bike.  Stack height is adjusted at the pads.  The S-Bend extensions don't stick out the back of the clamps, so you must cut them to your desired length.  The bike will work with either a mechanical or electronic drive train, but was shown with Shimano Di2.  When using an electronic drive train, all the wires are routed internally.  The Di2 A junction is hidden behind the front brake cover.  For a mechanical setup, the derailuer cables would exit out the back of the extensions.
  • The front end of the Bianchi is very clean with no exposed cables.  The integrated front brake is hidden behind a front cover that bolts onto the front fork.  Bianchi says the bike will accommodate wide rims and tires up to 25mm.
  • The front end of the Bianchi is very clean with no exposed cables.  The integrated front brake is hidden behind a front cover that bolts onto the front fork.  Bianchi says the bike will accommodate wide rims and tires up to 25mm.
  • Behind the fork, you can see a bumper to prevent the fork from damaging the frame.  The wheel cut-out on the frame appears to be very blunt, which may not be the best choice aerodynamically.
  • The back end of the Bianchi Aquila CV.
  • The underside of the Bianchi Aquila CV's base bar.  You can see how the risers for the pads attach, and how the front brake cover mates with the frame.
  • Bianchi uses a vibration reducing technology in their carbon fibre called Countervail.  We have not yet had a chance to ride a bike and test out the effectiveness of this technology.
  • The Bianchi Aquila CV has horizontal drop outs in back to allow you to snug the rear wheel in close to the frame for better aerodynamics.  The wheel position can be adjusted via a dial on the drop outs.
  • There is a TRP rear brake under the bottom bracket.
  • The seat post on the Bianchi Aquila CV is held in place with a single bolt wedge.
  • The Bianchi Aquila CV comes with a Fizik saddle and rack mount hook behind the saddle.  The seat post can be reversed to allow for more fit choices.
  • The drive train on the Bianchi Aquila CV was all DURA-ACE.
  • The drive train on the Bianchi Aquila CV was all DURA-ACE.
  • The underside of the Bianchi Aquila CV.

Related Articles
The new LOOK 796 Monoblade is a seriously narrow bike, sure to put up amazing low-yaw drag numbers in the wind tunnel. Here's our first impression.
The new Argon18 E119 is perhaps the most exciting new bike to come out this year. Here are all the ins and outs of the new machine.
Pinarello had Sir Bradley's record-setting Pinarello Bolide on display, and we think the ultra-custom bike is worthy of some individual attention.
Our final day of Interbike images for your viewing pleasure.
Unveiled at Interbike 2014, FSA is designing some very fit-minded and function-rich front end products, though just at the concept stage right now.