Service Course: James Seear
images by Nick Salazar
Sep 30, 2013  hits 65,127

TriRig Service Course
TriRig Service Course
This is the area we zeroed in on for his Service Course appointment. It was all about cleaning up that front end.
This is the area we zeroed in on for his Service Course appointment. It was all about cleaning up that front end.

We recently unveiled our Service Course series, a designation given to articles that have a very personal connection to them. Primarily, this means pro triathletes who have come to TriRig for some very special custom work on their bikes. But the TriRig Service Course can be used for any kind of special bike work, including rigs I make for myself.

Today, we're looking at the race rig for Jimmy Seear, a pro I met earlier this year while perusing the pro rack at the Boulder Peak triathlon. As I was taking some pictures of Jimmy's front end, he said hi to me in the very nicest way possible, shouting 'Hey man, I love your brake!' After chatting with Jim for a bit, I suggested that he was giving up some free speed with a rather messy front-end cable situation. He agreed, and signed up to be the next victi-- um, client -- of the TriRig Service Course. So he came down to TriRig HQ, and I got to work on his rig.

In the end, I think we pulled off exactly what I was hoping for. Jim's bike is now like a knife through the wind, and not a single front-end cable hangs out in the air. Have a look through the gallery, and specifically the captions, for more information on this project. Enjoy!



  • This is the area we zeroed in on for his Service Course appointment. It was all about cleaning up that front end.
  • Here's another closeup of the area in question. It's easy to see why we wanted to clean this up, it's simply messy.
  • Here's the finished bike. We cleaned up all the cables, and even swapped the front black brake for a white one to blend in further. I love the look! More specifics coming up. The very next picture is this same image, with some additional info written on it ...
  • ... So here's a description of what we did. We achieved a VERY clean front end, with all the Di2 goodies hidden, and the front brake housing sitting entirely within the existing frontal profile of the bike. We also swapped his front brake for a white one, which really disappears into his custom paint job.
  • Another issue Jimmy had was where to put his Garmin. Previously, he was using the XLab Torpedo mount to run a BTA bottle, but it forced him to put his garmin out to the SIDE, sitting completely in the wind, and to his right. But there is a brand new product that turned out to be the perfect solution for Jimmy ...
  • ... and Jimmy's new solution is the Speedfil Z4+ bottle. The Z4+ is built with BTA applications in mind. It has lots of built-in slots for zip ties to be inserted, making BTA installation a breeze. It also has an integrated Garmin mount that lets you put the computer right on top of the bottle. In Jimmy's case, this was perfect, because it lets him leave his hands in their aggressive stacked position, and still see the computer, without leaving it out in the wind.
  • And here's what the Z4+ looks like with a bottle and computer mounted up.
  • Another shot of the front end and that Speedfil Z4+. You can see Jimmy's arm pads are well worn, a sign of a bike with LOTS of miles on it.
  • So this is how Jimmy rides with the new Z4+ bottle between the arms. It's perfect! The wind sees nothing, and Jimmy keeps all the functionality he needs up front.
  • James Seear's Blue Triad SL, with custom TriRig Service Course treatment.
  • James Seear's Blue Triad SL, with custom TriRig Service Course treatment.
  • James Seear's Blue Triad SL, with custom TriRig Service Course treatment.
  • We hid his Di2 front junction inside the external steerer tube of the Triad SL's front fork. This way, he retains access to the adjustment button and battery indicator, without having it stick out in the wind.
  • Another shot of James Seear's Blue Triad SL, with custom TriRig Service Course treatment. Obviously these are just training wheels, but the rest of the bike is race-ready.
  • And finally, here's Jim with his newly-tricked-out bike. He's ready to fly, no cables left to slow him down.

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