Interbike 2013 - Outdoor Demo
images by Nick Salazar
Sep 16, 2013  hits 130,659

Outdoor Demo is a chance for industry folks to try out a lot of product firsthand. The Interbike precursor event is always held against the beautiful but extra-hot backdrop of the Las Vegas desert.
Outdoor Demo is a chance for industry folks to try out a lot of product firsthand. The Interbike precursor event is always held against the beautiful but extra-hot backdrop of the Las Vegas desert.

Interbike's famous Outdoor Demo day is an opportunity for manufacturers to get their get into the hands of a LOT of industry people all at once. Typically, the rocky terrain leads itself to a lot of road and mountain bike product, but the diligent journalist can find a whole cache of triathlon-specific product hidden away in the sand. Enjoy our supersized gallery



Tags » chrisking,  felt,  fizik,  interbike2013,  look,  prologo,  sram,  supersized,  wd40
  • Outdoor Demo is a chance for industry folks to try out a lot of product firsthand. The Interbike precursor event is always held against the beautiful but extra-hot backdrop of the Las Vegas desert.
  • For the last four years running, Felt has had a prime location at Outdoor demo, taking up the first visible location inside the park.
  • Felt is finally shipping their high-end DA bikes with their equally-high-end Devox Carbon aerobar. This bar is probably as sleek as they come for uci-legal bars. It's also highly adjustable.
  • Currently, Felt has no plans to sell the Devox Carbon as an aftermarket item, since it supposedly only works with the narrow integrated stem of the DA itself. But I know at least <a href='store.php?c=sigma' >one other</a > standard stem that works with it!
  • I would like to see the Felt Devox carbon released to the aftermarket. C'mon, Felt!
  • It's been several years since the bike industry promised that road disc brakes were 'right around the corner.' This year, that finally seems true. SRAM and TRP both have road discs in production. SRAM and Shimano have hydraulic rim brakes in production as well. If you've felt like a lack of braking power was a problem for you, there's a new solution that promises to eliminate that issue completely.
  • WD-40 has been a secret weapon for many cycling mechanics for many years; it works really well in a variety of applications, is easy to find, and is relatively cheap. The brand has finally caught on, and is now mareting a few cycling-specific products alongside its flagship Water Displacer formula #40.
  • Cardo is selling some two-way radios with built-in head sets. Not a bad idea at all, especially for outdoor athetes who can easily lose contact during a race or training session.
  • A small company called 'bikefittools' has developed this slick little system to measure the contact points on your bike. It's like a manual version of the Retul Zin tool.
  • The bikefittools measurement tool in action on the saddle.
  • I saw someone with this Stedicam GoPro mount with a countereight and auto-leveling float. Very slick indeed. o=I am currently working on reviewing the Hero 3, so something like this may be in my future.
  • As usual Giant's fleet of demo bikes was ... well ... giant!
  • Rudy Project's latest shades, the Spinhawk, have an irresistible orange hue to them, and despite the radical look of the Multilaser Orange lens, the interior hue (looking out) is a pleasant neutral shade.
  • I couldn't leave the Rudy Spinhawk well enough alone, and had to pick up a pair for myself.
  • Now this was a really cool product. From Prologo, it's called CPC technology (for 'Connect Power Control'). All those little holes work like tiny suction devices. Normally I'd roll my eyes at such a claim, but the gloves really do work a lot better than your standard thick-padded gloves.
  • All those tiny holes are like miniature suction cups, like on the underside of an octopus. I mentioned the resemblance to the Prologo rep, who smiled knowingly and said the similarity is no coincidence. Prologo is using the same tech on some of their new saddles but without a single single split-nose design in their lineup, I predict they're going to struggle to keep a good hold in the TT market as the years march on.
  • And those loops between the first and last pair of fingers? Those are to help you pull the gloves OFF your hand when finished, and still keep the gloves right-side out. Brilliant!
  • KMC makes some of the best chains in the industry and I recommend them for any build. Their quick-release master links are also quite easy to use, and highly useful.
  • SRAM had a lot of hydraulic equipment on display including their new Hydro rim brake. This brake looks quite nice, and actually stays out of the wind much better than its cabled counterpart. I haven't used it yet but it looks like a great product.
  • As a rear brake, the hydro rim caliper has a similarly small profile, and in this position, the cable routing works to its advantage, keeping the cable tucked neatly against the frame.
  • SRAM's hydraulic STI levers add just a bit of volume up front to account for the space required by the master cylinder to move the hydraulic fluid.
  • And SRAM's hydraulic rim brakes laced to Zipp hoops.
  • The Red 22 components look almost exactly like their 10-speed counterparts ...
  • ... it's just a little '22' insignia next to the red stripe that let you know this version means buiness
  • Quarq's new high-end Elsa powermeter crank ...
  • ... and the little brother Riken.
  • Chris King brought a lot of anodized components along ...
  • ... and I can't resist taking pictures of shiny orange things!
  • Fizik's lineup of saddles has, until recently, included only traditionally-shaped saddpes ...
  • ... but this year, Fizik finally released a split-nosed model called the Tritone. I'll be doing an in-depth review of the saddle very soon.
  • The Fizik Tritone saddle. Review coming soon.
  • The Fizik Tritone saddle. Review coming soon.
  • The Fizik Tritone saddle. Review coming soon.
  • The new look for the Vision Trimax crank is a nice touch for this aero bauble.
  • You can see the Vision's shape is quite smooth.
  • As a true BB30 crank, the Trimax has the potential to be pretty light, but it doesn't reach the lows of some other boutique cranks.
  • The LOOK 675 has a pretty interesting aluminum stem designed into the frame. But the cable routing up front leaves a lot to be desired.
  • The LOOK 675 has a pretty interesting aluminum stem designed into the frame. But the cable routing up front leaves a lot to be desired.
  • The LOOK 675 has a pretty interesting aluminum stem designed into the frame. But the cable routing up front leaves a lot to be desired.
  • On the other hand, the LOOK 695 has a gorgeous adjustable carbon stem, the venerable Zed crank, and a trick integrated front brake that truly hides the cable. Not bad, Look! Where's the TT version of this bike?
  • On the other hand, the LOOK 695 has a gorgeous adjustable carbon stem, the venerable Zed crank, and a trick integrated front brake that truly hides the cable. Not bad, Look! Where's the TT version of this bike?
  • On the other hand, the LOOK 695 has a gorgeous adjustable carbon stem, the venerable Zed crank, and a trick integrated front brake that truly hides the cable. Not bad, Look! Where's the TT version of this bike?
  • On the other hand, the LOOK 695 has a gorgeous adjustable carbon stem, the venerable Zed crank, and a trick integrated front brake that truly hides the cable. Not bad, Look! Where's the TT version of this bike?
  • On the other hand, the LOOK 695 has a gorgeous adjustable carbon stem, the venerable Zed crank, and a trick integrated front brake that truly hides the cable. Not bad, Look! Where's the TT version of this bike?
  • On the other hand, the LOOK 695 has a gorgeous adjustable carbon stem, the venerable Zed crank, and a trick integrated front brake that truly hides the cable. Not bad, Look! Where's the TT version of this bike?
  • On the other hand, the LOOK 695 has a gorgeous adjustable carbon stem, the venerable Zed crank, and a trick integrated front brake that truly hides the cable. Not bad, Look! Where's the TT version of this bike?
  • On the other hand, the LOOK 695 has a gorgeous adjustable carbon stem, the venerable Zed crank, and a trick integrated front brake that truly hides the cable. Not bad, Look! Where's the TT version of this bike?
  • I bumped into the tri world's most famous identical twins, the Thorhnam brothers, the engineering team behind Flo Cycling wheels.
  • Not every item at Interbike has to do with cycling ... this slick Lotus Elise was on display to help promote something.
  • In fact, all kinds of neat wheeled vehicles can be found on the streets of Outdoor Demo.
  • A subtle reminder to stay safe on your bike with some bright lights!
  • It's important to always have enough cameras to shoot the event, but this may be overkill. At least he'll be aero with the Giro Air Attack lid on.
  • Interbike is a vast experience, and it sometimes looks as if the tents will never end.

Related Articles
As we head into race day, here are some of the sights and scenes we encountered around the Ironman Village expo at the 2015 Ironman Hawaii World Championships.
We get up close and personal with the defending World Champion's chosen rig.
The 2013 edition of the Ironman World Championships was one of the most explosive races in recent memory. Here is our supersized gallery of images of the cyclists out on course. Enjoy!
As usual, Interbike is like Christmas for those of us who love bicycle equipment. This year's edition had plenty of cool triathlon gear on offer. Enjoy the gallery!
The gloves came off, and the rain came down. Here's our gallery of the 70.3 WC race-day event.