VIDEO Review - Shimano Di2
images by Nick Salazar
Sep 7, 2011  hits 68,197

No cables on this Di2 beauty.
No cables on this Di2 beauty.

Shimano's Di2 system has been around for a while, but we haven't seen any in-depth reviews from the triathlete's perspective. The system offers some tangible benefits to triathletes, which we explore at length in our video review here.

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  • The bar-end shifters are an ergonomic dream, encouraging a pistol grip, and making shifting incredibly easy.
  • I have my shifters pointing upwards, and I shift via my thumbs.
  • The underside of the bars.
  • The brake lever shifters are phenomenal, and put shifting control right at your thumbs.  And at just 112g, they're lighter than any STI on the market.
  • Internal cable routing give this Di2 installation very clean lines.
  • I really like how clean the Di2 setup looks.
  • I cut a hole in my Speed Concept's stem cover in order to integrate the control box.  I stole the idea from Team HTC Columbia
  • A zoomed out view of the stem area.
  • No cables on this Di2 beauty.
  • The front derailleur shifts beautifully.  We paired ours with a set of super light Fibre-Lyte chainrings, which shift amazingly well.
  • The front derailleur is one of Di2's marvels.  Shimano recommends using only Dura Ace cranks and rings, but the Fibre-Lyte rings work VERY well.
  • The gorgeous rear derailleur, mounted on my Kurt Kinetic trainer.

Related Articles
Shimano's Di2 electronic shift system has been a favorite of ours since we first wrote about it in 2011. A lot has changed since then, and we wanted to publish an update on Di2 as it relates to triathletes.
Ultegra Di2 TT components are built around the new E-tube system and will be compatible with upcoming 9070 Dura-Ace Di2. Read on for the whole scoop.
Electronic is getting cheaper for roadies - but not yet for triathletes.
SRAM's new wireless electronic group is here, though it's not exactly wireless for triathletes.
The new e-tube Di2 junction boxes are big and bulky, making them difficult to hide from the wind. But Shimano already makes a special little part that makes hidden cables a cinch.

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