VIDEO Review - Finis Swimp3
images by Nick Salazar
Jan 5, 2011  hits 23,752

The Swimp3 ultimately serves its purpose, but wasn't a superlative performer.
The Swimp3 ultimately serves its purpose, but wasn't a superlative performer.

The most boring part about swimming is that you don't get any sensory stimulation beyond staring at the bottom of the pool. And given that electronics don't generally play well with water, there hasn't been much in the way of portable music that works for a swim workout. Finis is making one of the few units designed for underwater use, the Swimp3. Rather than use headphones, which can easily slip out of your ears, or fill up with water, the Swimp3 uses bone conduction plates to deliver sound without needing air. Check out the video review for more.


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Tags » finis,  gadgets,  
  • The right-hand side of the Finis Swimp3 is the control unit.  It has a simple on/off, combo track+volume controls, and a reset button.
  • The left-hand unit just has the second speaker, and no controls.
  • The unit doesn't use earbuds, but rather bone conduction plates that deliver sound by vibrating your skull instead of the air (since there isn't any underwater, duh).
  • The USB port lets you load music onto the device just as you would with a thumb drive.  Simple and elegant - we like this.
  • The Swimp3 ultimately serves its purpose, but wasn't a superlative performer.

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