Review: Orbea Ordu OMP
article & images by Nick Salazar
Feb 16, 2016  hits 89,514

BB386 bottom bracket and truncated downtube shapes.

Moving backwards, things stay clean and functional. The tube shapes are straightforward and non-gimmicky. Truncated airfoils appear on the head tube and down tube, and the seat tube hugs the rear wheel nicely. That rear wheel sits in vertical dropouts, a welcome feature as well for those of us who are perpetually annoyed by horizontal drops. The down tube has three bottle bosses allowing for high or low bottle placement. There is no shortage of options of how to set up accessories on the bike.

Behind the seatpost, a custom cable stop allows you to run bare cable to the rear Omega X brake, for an incredibly clean setup that still keeps the brake very easy to access. It's a really cool solution, though again, I'm biased to like it. Of course, if you want to run a different brake, you can route housing through another hole out the side of the top tube. One more nice feature is a pair of bottle bosses on the seat tube, allowing more storage options. Orbea makes an integrated box that goes there, though not pictured as I didn't have one for my review.

Orbea has ditched Shimano's BB86 standard in favor of the newer FSA BB386 EVO standard. And yes, that is a mouthful. I'll just call it 386. The 386 standard is basically like BBRight, except it's symmetrical, keeping an 11mm cylindrical protrusion on the drive-side that BBRight doesn't use. You could also say 386 is just a wider version of PF30 - precisely 9.25mm wider on each side. PF30 and its younger brother BB30 are easily my favorite bottom bracket standards, as they're simple and basically compatible with every crank on the market. But 386 is very good as well, trading a bit of crank compabitility in favor of a wider bearing stance and increased frame stiffness.

The flippable seatpost allows a variety of positions, but isn't quite as easy to use as the Ritchey SideBinder design.

The seatpost clamp is a traditional two-bolt clamshell design, perhaps the one piece of hardware I'm not super keen about. I prefer wedge-style clamps which don't add any frontal area. Regardless, this version works perfectly well and is nearly invisible to the wind itself. In another wrinkle, Orbea decided to invent its own saddle clamp solution rather than go with the industry-favorite Ritchey SideBinder. Orbea's solution is fine, but I tend to prefer the simplicity of Ritchey's single-bolt clamp, as well as the accessories that have been developed for it like XLAB's Delta Sonic.

Overall, lots of really great things on the bike, with a few minor nitpicks. Hit the jump for my conclusions.


Tags » dash,  frames,  orbea,  rigs,  servicecourse,  tririg

Orbea Ordu OMP 

The new Orbea Ordu OMP is a new bike that aims to hit modern superbike aero numbers without resorting to the increasingly-difficult mechanics of integrated parts.

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Front End 

The Ordu OMP comes stock with Omega X brakes, designed to be a perfect aero match for the entire front end complex. We also added our Alpha X bars, which blend nearly perfectly into the raised top tube.

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Details 

We finished the bike with a SRAM 1x11 drivetrain, Lightning cranks, Dash wheels, Dash saddle, and View-Speed bolt-on aero skewers. This beast is completely race-ready and 15.5 lbs as pictured (yes, including the disc wheel).

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