Review: the Ventum One Superbike
article & images by Nick Salazar
Oct 8, 2015  hits 88,132

Ventum is one of several new bike companies on the scene, trying to make its mark on triathlon in a big way. Two other new startups, Dimond and Culprit, are also coming into the tri space with new tri-specific bikes with non-traditional geometry. Ventum's aero pedigree comes from the likes of Lotus, whose original 108 track bike, and later the 110 road bike, were models of aero supremacy for some time. If we trust Cervelo's claim (and I do), then it wasn't until the introduction of the Cervelo P4 and later bikes that the old Lotus 110 was finally supplanted. It was a tough frame to beat. And now, Ventum is using that same basic frame layout but with modern design, to hopefully reach the next plateau.

The look of the bike is, without a doubt, polarizing. Some think it looks gorgeous, others say it's absolutely hideous. Some fall in the middle, saying its aesthetics don't matter to them as long as it performs. I'd be lying if I said the only thing that matters to me is performance; I'm like most folks, and swayed by appearance. On that note, I have to say I'm not completely thrilled with the look of the Ventum One, but it also does some really cool things aerodynamically.

The bike here is Leanda Cave's bike - or more specifically, it's her spare bike, built as an exact replica of her race rig. More often, it's ridden by company co-founder Jimmy Seear, who swaps out his own saddle and his preferred TriRig Gamma extensions. Let's take a good look at this thing, from tip to tail.

We'll start with the frame itself, then move to the integrated bottle, the front end, and finally my conclusions.


The complete bike 

Here is the Ventum One in all its glory. This is Leanda Cave's spare bike, complete with her custom paint scheme.

  • The complete bike
  • The complete bike
  • The complete bike
  • The complete bike
  • The complete bike
  • The complete bike

Bottle 

The Ventum One features an integrated 1.4L bottle that takes the place of two standard bottles, and is refillable. I'm not super keen on the protruding fill cap and the hardware up front, but it's definitely a functional piece.

  • Bottle
  • Bottle
  • Bottle
  • Bottle
  • Bottle
  • Bottle

Front End 

The front end of the Ventum One is clean enough, but the open mold parts are a bit of a disappointment. To be fair, it uses a standard steerer, so you could potentially swap out the stem, bars, and even the fork/brake if you wanted.

  • Front End
  • Front End
  • Front End
  • Front End
  • Front End
  • Front End

Details 

More shots of the various aspects of this new bike.

  • Details
  • Details
  • Details
  • Details
  • Details
  • Details
  • Details
  • Details
  • Details
  • Details
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  • Jimmy Seear, who has the optimism of Walt Disney, and the hair of Albert Einstein.

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