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Power Up, pt 4: Andy Potts
article & images by Nick Salazar
Mar 12, 2012  hits 76,459

This is Part 4 of the Power Up series.

As promised earlier, we're going to hear from a pro in the trenches. And perhaps no one is more committed to the rigorous, methodical use of power than Andy Potts. The 2004 Olympian and 70.3 powerhouse lives in Colorado Springs with his wife and two kids, and uses his home workout pad as a base of operations for all his cycling workouts.

Andy built a separate structure in his back yard, the size of a single-car garage, and made it into his own space just for working out. But calling it a "workout pad" doesn't do it justice. Potts named it the Pain Cave, and it's everything a triathlete could dream for. It has a pilates machine, treadmill, weights, fitness equipment, a full linen closet, refrigerator, surround stereo system, and a flatscreen TV. But the bread and butter of this place is the bike trainer - a Computrainer, to be precise. Potts puts in countless hours sitting on his race bike, a Kestrel 4000 SL, and churning away on his Computrainer.

Andy Potts is perhaps the most dedicated indoor rider in triathlon. He does nearly all of his rides on a Computrainer.

In fact, Potts does nearly all of his bike training here, and avoids outdoor rides even when the weather is fine. Why? Well, I could talk to you about consistency, FTP, or the stochastic nature of power data, but Andy did a great job of explaining it himself. Watch the full interview below where Andy gave very generously of his time to chat with me about power, and what it means for the age grouper and pro triathlete alike.

I'd like to thank Andy for letting me in to his home to chat with him about power, and for all the great advice he was so willing to give. Enjoy the gallery below, and stay tuned for more in the Power Up series!

Tags » andypotts,  kestrel,  powerup,  srmpower
  • Potts stands outside his Pain Cave, the separate structure where he does the majority of his training.
  • The Pain Cave has anything you'd need - a fridge, stereo system, HDTV, and of course, the bike.
  • Potts says his regular routine involves reading through the stack of magazines next to him.  Pretty easy way to train.
  • Behind him, Andy keeps a gallery of momentous pictures from his notable career.
  • Because he tortures his Computrainer so much, Potts keeps a fan running on it at all times to help dissapate heat.
  • Potts getting down to business.
  • The Pain Cave isn't just for cycling - it has a full treadmill and other fitness equipment sitting just off-camera.
  • Potts is currently riding a Kestrel 4000 SL with Shimano Di2.
  • Don't let his serious visage fool you, Andy is a joker at heart, and always has time for a laugh.
  • Andy's Ergometer of choice is the Dura Ace SRM - and it is indeed a choice, since he's not sponsored by SRM.
  • Potts swears by his trusty Computrainer, which helps keep him in the right power zone.
  • Di2 up front keeps the shifting nice and easy.
  • Potts runs the Pro Missile TT bar with single-bend extensions and Di2 shifters.
  • Potts in silhouette.
  • Andy Potts throwing down in the Pain Cave.
  • I like how Kestrel routes their front brake cable as a centerpull.  It's definitely
  • Pedal to the metal, Andy!
  • Thanks for letting me come in and chat with you, Andy!  It's always a pleasure.

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