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TorHans Aero 20 Review
article & images by Nick Salazar
Nov 14, 2011  hits 57,341

The TorHans cap is easy to refill, and the optional Aero Tray provides easy access to a computer.

In some ways, the best news to report about an aero bottle is that there isn't any news. The way these types of bottles function is very simple: the bottle installs via a special bracket that straps to your aerobars. A straw sits just below your mouth while riding, ready for you to drink at any time. The bottle itself has a reservoir that's refillable while riding, so that for longer races you can add more liquid from aid stations. That's the core functionality that you want, and the TorHans Aero 20 does those things just fine. Installation was a breeze, and the bottle works.

The straw has a novel mast that both keeps the straw in place, and also acts as an aerodynamic fairing. This again is a testament to the engineering that went into the product. The TorHans guys really wanted to reduce the drag penalty of these types of bottles. I really didn't perceive any issues with the straw at all.

As for the refill mechanism, the bottle keeps with its minimal theme. Instead of a complicated mechanism, or a sponge prone to fly out at any time, the Aero 20 uses a simple double-walled refill cap that is as simple as it is effective. It's easy to refill, but keeps water in while riding. If you just fill the bottle and shake it by hand, you can get some liquid to splash out. But while riding, I never saw more than a drop or two to come out. Perhaps on very rough roads you'd see a little more splash, but for normal riding, the cap works very well. An additional cap is included with the Aero20 that is NOT refillable, and just seals the opening completely. This is a nice option if you're doing a shorter race and don't want to deal with any potential leaks.

The other very nice feature of the bottle is the optional computer mount, called the Aero Tray. It clicks right in to the bottle itself, and provides a nice perch for a cycling computer. It puts the computer right behind the bottle, so it's shielded from the wind, but also very easy to see. I've started riding with my iPhone as a computer, and so couldn't use this mount as planned, but it looks like an excellent way to mount up something Garmin-sized or smaller.


Tags » hydration,  torhans
  • The TorHans Aero 20 is a simple, effective, and well-thought-out solution to triathlon hydration.
  • The Aero Mount Bracket cradles the bottle while riding - you just snap it in, and tighten it down with a strap across the front.
  • The Aero Mount bracket is easy to install - just one zip tie on each side, and it adjusts to fit the width of most aerobars.
  • Even on super skinny bikes with no spacers, the TorHans doesn't take up much space at all.
  • The Aero Tray behind the bottle makes a great place to put a computer, and the minimal refill cap is simple but quite effective.
  • Even the straw gets the aero treatment, and the mast helps keep it in place without resorting to a super sharp, rigid straw.
  • This is how TorHans tested all their equipment - it's a set of dummy arms that makes for very repeatable tests.  Although if I'm nitpicking, I'll say that I don't think his hands are optimally positioned - I think it's usually best to wrap hands around the front of the shifters.
  • The TorHans wind tunnel results.

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